Hi Chris, "Good content" means a couple of things - good for readers and good for Google. Good content for readers means that the content answers questions, provides value, offers solutions, and is engaging. You want to keep the reader on the page and on your website for as long as possible. To make good content for Google, you have to provide the search engine with a set of signals - e.g., keywords, backlinks, low bounce rates, etc... The idea is that if you make good content for readers (engaging, valuable, actionable, and informative), your content will get more engagement. When your content gets more engagement Google will see it as good content too and put it higher in the SERPs. Making "good content" is about striking that balance. Let us know if that answered your question!
TrafficWave is, again, not quite a traffic exchange. Rather, it’s a valuable tool to use with the traffic you’ve already attained. It’s a fairly sophisticated autoresponder for email lists, with a 30-day trial and a suite of tools designed to help you put together the best autoresponses available. Use it in conjunction with any of your affiliate or referral programs for a sizable benefit.
If you haven’t used software like BuzzSumo to check out what your competitors are up to, you’re at a huge disadvantage. These services aggregate the social performance of specific sites and content to provide you with an at-a-glance view of what topics are resonating with readers and, most importantly, making the rounds on social media. Find out what people are reading (and talking about), and emulate that kind of content to bring traffic to your website.
Changing the theme on your website will not give you better rankings. Adding widgets to your sidebars will also not offer you more traffic. Checking your statistics on Google Analytics and/or Google Search Console frequently is also another major distraction and when you do not see the results you want, it can very often make you angry and unproductive.

If both page are closely related (lots of topical overlap), I would merge the unique content from the lower ranking article into the top ranking one, then 301 redirect the lower performing article into the top ranking one. This will make the canonical version more relevant, and give it an immediate authority boost. I would also fetch it right away, do some link building, and possibly a little paid promotion to seed some engagement. Update the time stamp.
As we briefly mentioned above, your website or blog posts should target your audience (your prospects, your readers). You should be writing to them. You should be asking yourself what your target audience is searching for on Google. Based on that, you should provide the solutions to their inquiries in the form of content that is coherent with their search terms. In other words, the keywords or key phrases you use within your content must coincide with what your audience is actively searching.
Hey Ashok! Good question. I work with clients in a lot of different industries, so the tactics I employ are often quite different depending on the client. In general though, creating killer resources around popular topics, or tools related to client services. This provides a ton of outreach opportunity. For example: We had a client build a tool that allowed webmasters to quickly run SSL scans on their sites and identofy non-secure resources. We reached out to people writing about SSLs, Https migration etc and pitched it as a value-add. We built ~50 links to that tool in 45 days. Not a massive total, but they were pretty much all DR 40+.
Writing a good piece of unique quality content will rank better in the search engines and it will also encourage people to like it, share it etc. People will not do that with your content if they see it as poor quality. Let’s be honest here, if you were reading something that you thought was pure garbage, would you read and share it? Of course you wouldn’t and neither would I.
Guest blogging purely for inbound links is a flawed strategy because the value of those links are going down. However, guest blogging for traffic is still an incredibly viable strategy. While that inbound link you get at the end of a guest post doesn’t have as much SEO value as it used to, it still has the value of exposing your content to a new audience.
Your keyword research will determine whether or not your search optimization effort will be a success or a failure. Many businesses make the mistake of basing their keywords on just the search volume. This often leads to attempting to rank for keywords that are very difficult and costly to move up, or even keywords that aren’t “buyer” keywords and just send useless traffic to the website.
Hey, Matt! Thank you for your sharing, and I learned much from it, but I still have a question. We began to do SEO work for our site 2 years ago, and our organic traffic grew 5 times ( from 8K to 40K every day). But two years later, it is very difficult to get it grow more, even it drop to 3.2K every day. So can you give me any advice to make our site's traffic grow again? Thank you in advance!
Posting every other day or skipping days rather than regularly posting on your website will not be going to attract traffic to your website. So, you should always have enough content in your hand that you can post regularly. One of the major benefits that regular posting will give you is that you will have regular traffic on your website which ultimately going to increase your organic traffic. Another thing is that your talent or skill will sharpen with regular writing & posting content. If you have a busy schedule or running a business at the same time, then you should hire writers to assist you.

This is a topic that for some time has lingered on my mind. Trying to find answers I want to hear or read rather than put in the hard long hours of quality work but it looks like there’s no running away from the truth. Common to what I’ve come across is quality content, consistency and low hanging fruits keywords which have proven to yield results when I started to put it to test. In fact, I agree with you that no good results come on a silver platter. 


Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:
If you've never been on Product Hunt before, it's like a daily Reddit feed for new products. Products get submitted to the community and they're voted on. Each day products are stacked in descending order based on how many votes they've had. Ranking at the top of the daily list can result in thousands of conversion-focused traffic to your site, just as the creator of Nomad List found out.
Once you have the piece of content you want to repurpose and the keywords you’re optimizing for, Google it. Type in the keywords and hit enter. Then, compare your content to the content that’s front and center on page one. What are they talking about that you’re not? Are there any topics you need to add? Is the content even relevant to what you’re trying to say? Based on the content, what can you assume the user’s intent is with that particular keyword?
Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.

Simply great and agree with your all subject...! I like the way you explained. Each heading are awesome Create the best quality content and consistently, Long tail keyword is better, Guest blog for SEO is dead, and Aha....Do not anger Google. conclusion is awesome. Hard work and Patient is best practice to see the good results in any field. Really useful and helpful post indeed. Thank you.
Backlink Training: Our Full, Free Course on Backlinks and Link Building for SEO “If you build it, they will come.” That statement may have worked in Kevin Costner’s 1989 movie but certainly not in today’s competitive world of online marketing. You need to get more proactive. You need to become an SEO fighter. A warrior. A champion. Mind-blowing content is a great start, but...
Alas, there is no quick solution, especially when no one actually knows how Google’s search engine algorithm actually works. The strategies highlighted within this post are some of the better known strategies that improve your ranking chances. And, remember, whatever strategies you use will take time. Don’t expect a sudden increase in traffic if you tweak your SEO.
If you check out some of the suggestions below this though, you're likely to find some opportunities. You can also plug in a few variations of the question to find some search volume; for example, I could search for "cup of java" instead of "what is the meaning of a cup of java" and I'll get a number of keyword opportunities that I can align to the question.
To do this, I often align the launch of my content with a couple of guest posts on relevant websites to drive a load of relevant traffic to it, as well as some relevant links. This has a knock-on effect toward the organic amplification of the content and means that you at least have something to show for the content (in terms of ROI) if it doesn't do as well as you expect organically.
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