PBP is sort of a cross between a traffic generator and a multi-level marketing scheme, only without the threats that MLM traditionally entails. You’re not absolutely required to sign up under someone, though the program does cost money on a monthly basis. You’re granted access to traffic generation tools, as well as other promotional information and training. The MLM comes in with their referral commissions, which many people use more than the marketing tools themselves. There’s a sizable commission for enrolling new members, as well as seeing them succeed.
Like I said at the beginning, building organic traffic is hard. Anything that promises a shortcut to an avalanche of traffic will more than likely lead to a penalty down the road. Embrace the daily grind of creating great content that helps users and provides a solution to what they’re looking for. In the end that will drive more organic traffic than any shortcut ever will.
All we found useful with this app was a link to download the Alexa toolbar, but that doesn't justify the steep asking price for this ineffective tool. There's a note that the registered program offers additional benefits, but doesn't elaborate. Frankly, this application seems designed to lure users to directing traffic to the unfamiliar site. We can't recommend it to any user for any reason.
As a new blogger or entrepreneur, one of the challenges you encounter is for your blog post or your website to “rank” well in the search results of any search engine. By ranking, I mean that whenever your potential reader or prospect searches for a product or service that you have to offer, your website comes up on the first page of the search results. The term “Organic Search” means that someone is searching for your website or post through the traditional search on the search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.). This is also known as organic ranking.
Hey Ashok! Good question. I work with clients in a lot of different industries, so the tactics I employ are often quite different depending on the client. In general though, creating killer resources around popular topics, or tools related to client services. This provides a ton of outreach opportunity. For example: We had a client build a tool that allowed webmasters to quickly run SSL scans on their sites and identofy non-secure resources. We reached out to people writing about SSLs, Https migration etc and pitched it as a value-add. We built ~50 links to that tool in 45 days. Not a massive total, but they were pretty much all DR 40+.
Help your contributors out by clearly outlining who they should be writing to (your target audience), how you want them to portray your company, brand, service, or product (make sure it’s on brand), sharing a few examples of great content out there (politely nudge them to fulfill your content marketing vision), and encouraging them to include links to research, etc. (SEO best practices).
This is a topic that for some time has lingered on my mind. Trying to find answers I want to hear or read rather than put in the hard long hours of quality work but it looks like there’s no running away from the truth. Common to what I’ve come across is quality content, consistency and low hanging fruits keywords which have proven to yield results when I started to put it to test. In fact, I agree with you that no good results come on a silver platter. 
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
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