As we briefly mentioned above, your website or blog posts should target your audience (your prospects, your readers). You should be writing to them. You should be asking yourself what your target audience is searching for on Google. Based on that, you should provide the solutions to their inquiries in the form of content that is coherent with their search terms. In other words, the keywords or key phrases you use within your content must coincide with what your audience is actively searching.
Traffic exchange users are comparatively low quality, but they’re still real humans. You’re getting real people to view your site, you’re just not bringing them in organically the way Google intends. You can make money from these users, but your conversion rate will be typically lower than what you might see from organic traffic. Of course, it’s also much cheaper and faster to find this traffic than it is to invest in SEO and content marketing.
Just to make sure we’re all on the same page, let’s talk about how Google ranks content in the search engine results pages (SERPs). When a user goes to Google, Bing, or some other search browser out there, the browser will display results that are best suited to meet the user’s needs or answer their question. To earn organic traffic, you’d better hope that the content you’re creating shows up in the SERPs.
Your keyword research will determine whether or not your search optimization effort will be a success or a failure. Many businesses make the mistake of basing their keywords on just the search volume. This often leads to attempting to rank for keywords that are very difficult and costly to move up, or even keywords that aren’t “buyer” keywords and just send useless traffic to the website.
Sad fact: because you’re focusing on answering user questions and blog content tends to focus on top-of-the-funnel users, bounce rates will almost certainly be higher on your blog than on other parts of your site. Don’t let that hurt your feelings—it’s normal. But, you should still be optimizing your blog posts to encourage further site navigation and newsletter signup or other lead capture techniques.

This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
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