This is another program doing much the same as the previous two, but it has a few unique aspects that put it on this list above the hordes of others. Particularly, it comes in many forms; a web interface, a stand-alone browser, a windows or mac executable or even a paid version. In a fit of goodwill, the paid version – costing $30 for the cheapest version – comes with a huge warning to try the free version before buying. It also warns of a lack of refund policy, so buyer beware.
Once you have the piece of content you want to repurpose and the keywords you’re optimizing for, Google it. Type in the keywords and hit enter. Then, compare your content to the content that’s front and center on page one. What are they talking about that you’re not? Are there any topics you need to add? Is the content even relevant to what you’re trying to say? Based on the content, what can you assume the user’s intent is with that particular keyword?
Hi there. I have just finished reading your article about getting organic traffic and thought I would just offer my opinion. Getting traffic is really important, but one thing that I have learned over the years of running a website is that Google doesn’t just start to give you their organic traffic for nothing. You really need to prove to Google that you are worthy of their traffic. Getting a big social media following is very important. 
If you've never been on Product Hunt before, it's like a daily Reddit feed for new products. Products get submitted to the community and they're voted on. Each day products are stacked in descending order based on how many votes they've had. Ranking at the top of the daily list can result in thousands of conversion-focused traffic to your site, just as the creator of Nomad List found out.
The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
The response rate here was huge because this is a mutually beneficial relationship. The bloggers get free products to use within their outfits (as well as more clothes for their wardrobe!) and I was able to drive traffic through to my site, get high-quality backlinks, a load of social media engagement and some high-end photography to use within my own content and on product pages.
Granted, the blog post I wrote today gives you a taste of some of the strategies you can use to increase your organic search traffic. However, SEO is a lot more involved than that. As I said before, there are lots of courses on SEO, free and paid training you can follow. One great blog that I enjoy reading to increase my SEO knowledge is the HOTH. I actually linked to a post of theirs on “Domain Authority” in the section titled Off-Site SEO above.
In my experience, content has impacted SEO and organic traffic more than pretty much any other one element (assuming you have a reasonably clean, fast, structurally sound site). That’s not to say things like sitemaps and link building aren’t important. They are, 100%. But, if you’re really trying to increase organic traffic dramatically, improving and creating content will be your best bet because it's essentially what your site is made up of. Plus, great content can help you earn links and boost your traffic in other ways so it’s what you should start with anyway.
Sad fact: because you’re focusing on answering user questions and blog content tends to focus on top-of-the-funnel users, bounce rates will almost certainly be higher on your blog than on other parts of your site. Don’t let that hurt your feelings—it’s normal. But, you should still be optimizing your blog posts to encourage further site navigation and newsletter signup or other lead capture techniques.
When Larry wrote about the kick in the proverbial teeth that eBay took from Google’s Panda update, we managed to secure a link from Ars Technica in the Editor’s Pick section alongside links to The New York Times and National Geographic. Not too shabby – and neither was the resulting spike in referral traffic. Learn what types of links send lots of referral traffic, and how to get them, in this post.
This is a simple but time-consuming process and an example of off-site SEO. Once you have written the type of content that makes you proud, and you publish it, it’s not going to get read by itself. You need to spend a lot of energy in promoting it. Fortunately, there are some tools that help you automate some of these tasks, but you still need to put in some time into it.

Thanks for sharing this insightful article on how to get organic traffic to my website. I agree with you that it is really frustrating posting articles on a site with little or no traffic to view my content. I think your article is right on time and I agree that creating high quality content, targeting low competition keywords, not being distracted and other vital points you made will really help me generate traffic into my blog. 
All we found useful with this app was a link to download the Alexa toolbar, but that doesn't justify the steep asking price for this ineffective tool. There's a note that the registered program offers additional benefits, but doesn't elaborate. Frankly, this application seems designed to lure users to directing traffic to the unfamiliar site. We can't recommend it to any user for any reason.
Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:
When you have an online business platform it is quite obvious that your viewers/consumers might be having queries or doubts about the content. In place of just giving them a short reply, you should aim for posting content related to the doubts or problems your clients or consumers are facing. You should answer WHY’s or WHAT’s of your clients because when all such questions are put up at Google, your website will be shown at top with all the answers. It would be a nice way to be targeted by Google & have more organic traffic.  
In short, press request alerts are requests for sources of information from journalists. Let's say you're a journalist putting together an article on wearable technology for The Guardian. Perhaps you need a quote from an industry expert or some products that you can feature within your article? Well, all you need to do is send out a request to a press service and you can wait for someone to get back to you.
This is another program doing much the same as the previous two, but it has a few unique aspects that put it on this list above the hordes of others. Particularly, it comes in many forms; a web interface, a stand-alone browser, a windows or mac executable or even a paid version. In a fit of goodwill, the paid version – costing $30 for the cheapest version – comes with a huge warning to try the free version before buying. It also warns of a lack of refund policy, so buyer beware.
Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”
Blog away. With my personal experience i can say that blogging can be a best way to bring some organic traffic on your website.it allows you to describe your business more deeply and can help you to keep user engaged.but while doing this must keep in mind that writing spammy or poor content will harm your site more than it may bring some profit in.
People use search engines to get more information about the products or services that they are interested in purchasing, as well as the businesses that they are interested in purchasing from. Consumers will turn to search engines before doing business with a large national company, and they will also utilize search engines when planning to make local purchases as well.
No, this isn’t a tool to generate traffic jams on your way to work. Instead, it’s a piece of software a lot like 1MC, designed to send hits towards a website repeatedly. This one is a quick and easy to use program, with very little in the way of customization options, but that’s okay. It’s designed to do one thing and one thing only, and it does that thing.
This community is full of opportunities if you're a fashion-based retailer. One of the major advantages is the fact that they add links to each of the products that they feature within their outfits - the links go directly to product pages. This is the holy grail for ecommerce SEO, and the traffic those links will bring through will convert at a very high rate.
Granted, the blog post I wrote today gives you a taste of some of the strategies you can use to increase your organic search traffic. However, SEO is a lot more involved than that. As I said before, there are lots of courses on SEO, free and paid training you can follow. One great blog that I enjoy reading to increase my SEO knowledge is the HOTH. I actually linked to a post of theirs on “Domain Authority” in the section titled Off-Site SEO above.
Hey Ashok! Good question. I work with clients in a lot of different industries, so the tactics I employ are often quite different depending on the client. In general though, creating killer resources around popular topics, or tools related to client services. This provides a ton of outreach opportunity. For example: We had a client build a tool that allowed webmasters to quickly run SSL scans on their sites and identofy non-secure resources. We reached out to people writing about SSLs, Https migration etc and pitched it as a value-add. We built ~50 links to that tool in 45 days. Not a massive total, but they were pretty much all DR 40+.
The number one reason we hit our traffic goal this year was because we were diligent and committed to repurposing and republishing old content. Necktafy supports this idea, and does a great job explaining what they call the “two-year blogging nosedive.” Summarized, the blogging nosedive is when a piece of content stops generating organic traffic, typically after two years.
PBP is sort of a cross between a traffic generator and a multi-level marketing scheme, only without the threats that MLM traditionally entails. You’re not absolutely required to sign up under someone, though the program does cost money on a monthly basis. You’re granted access to traffic generation tools, as well as other promotional information and training. The MLM comes in with their referral commissions, which many people use more than the marketing tools themselves. There’s a sizable commission for enrolling new members, as well as seeing them succeed.
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